3D-Printer with Nylon filament

3D-Printing first and foremost with Nylon, Cura 2.6.1


Hello my dear people! As humanity has struggled many thousand years to translate ideas into physical form, in our recent years it became cheap, easy and quite fast to bring some imagined object, from the board to the physical world.

Amidst dropping prices in 3D-Printing I decided to choose the Anet-A6 for merely 180 € including some PLA-filament as my first 3D-Printer. I built it in a day following the YouTube tutorials and after a day of struggle with the build plate adhesion, I printed my first print from Thingiverse. A Raspberry Pi case >>link by User 0110-M-P. A glass plate on the hot-plate and an added brim to the print did the trick!

 

 

After this – great success – I encountered different Errors and fixed them:

  • Tighten the belts! Wobble is your worst enemy…
  • When zeroing the heat-bed be extra precise to really be in that 0.1 mm range.
  • I always print on a cleaned glass-plate with a brim depending on how high and broad the object is.
  • Tighten all the screws on your printer, even if parts are assembled, often the screws are not tight at all.
  • Don’t print too hot.
  • Make sure you have dry filament.

3D-Printing with Nylon?

This was the beginning and I was already hooked, so many possibilities!

So along came the first project I could implement my skills. I needed a casing for Lab-equipment which should withstand specific low risk/non reactive chemicals and be sturdy and look nice… Well… Nylon! That was the filament I needed! So off I got and ordered some from E-Bay.

For the first print, a small time-frame, coarse quality and something more useful then beautiful  had to be found – a soap dish?

I chose Artisan Soap Dish from user brackett27! Stylish, classic and enough for the first test!

Now I still use Cura for printing and since the new Version it was really easy to choose the right configuration. Material:->Nylon and Profile->Coarse Quality 0.4 mm. I chose to print a brim of 1 cm and adjusted the print-speed to 50 mm/s. Done!

The result and strength were enough for my application purposes but I am sure next time printing with Nylon can improve:

 

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